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HYOSUNG— Inspiring Banking and Retail

With innovation, creativity, and technology - Hyosung offers inspired solutions to bridge the physical and digital for incomparable cash experiences. From Branch Transformation, to Cash Management Solutions, to Retail Solutions, Hyosung offers a variety of ways for businesses to grow and be successful. With the goal of inspiring growth and changing the industry, Hyosung is leading a transformational revolution that will inspire the consumer experience worldwide.

Audio podcast
Inspired Banking Episode 3
Drive-up banking has been around for years, and most use it frequently when they need a simple banking transaction fulfilled. Daniel Litwin sits down with Bill Budde, the VP of Banking Strategy and...

Drive-up banking has been around for years, and most use it frequently when they need a simple banking transaction fulfilled. Daniel Litwin sits down with Bill Budde, the VP of Banking Strategy and Solutions at Hyosung, to discuss evolving trends and technology in drive-up banking.

As technology develops and banking adopts new technologies, we’ll see the banking workforce meet higher efficiency, increasing service hours and improving customer experience. As banks eliminate outdated and hard-to-service technology like VAT, interactions at the banks will become quicker and more enjoyable for individuals. Ideal use cases include expanding automation both on personal devices and at ATMs.

Current consumers are already used to a certain amount of automation, including checking their balance online or on a machine, but enhancing that technology will allow consumers to more easily withdraw from an existing line of credit or even open a new line of credit.

Simply depositing a check or transferring funds from one account to another has become more convenient, however, Budde expresses “the biggest thing you see is the basic transactional stuff customers are [more and more] choosing to self serve... an in-person interaction is centered around the deeper style of needs for customers like opening a new line of credit or fulfilling a mortgage or getting an auto loan. Those are a bigger impact financially on a person’s life.” The more complex banking interactions require individuals or some fulfillment role. With video calls, an ATM could ultimately be used as a portal to the entire operation of the bank, including more complex financial relationships. A remote individual can check the physical requirements that those transactions would need. Or, if an individual is required for a question, they can be brought into the interaction.

The human touchpoint will be more centralized and address more locations. Overall, convenience has to be flexible based on the customers' needs, but it has its benefits for bank tellers too. There is a trend toward digital-first banking. This trend has grown with customer behavior changes during the pandemic. There has been a drive to automate repetitive tasks to allow employees to focus on customer service and relationship building.

Automating these tasks lessens stress and caters to a more engaging work environment. Keeping up with technology will help banks attract and retain employees.

Inspired Banking Episode 2
ATMs have long been a part of the banking processing, but the pandemic accelerated the use of self-service tools in banking was. Bill Budde, Vice President of Banking Strategy and Solutions for Hyo...

ATMs have long been a part of the banking processing, but the pandemic accelerated the use of self-service tools in banking was. Bill Budde, Vice President of Banking Strategy and Solutions for Hyosung, spoke with Inspired Banking host Tyler Kern about the evolution of banking self-service tools and which technology benefits end-user experience and bank efficiency.

The prevalence of deposit automation opened the door to drive straightforward transactions to automation instead and bypass administrative tasks employees would otherwise need to complete. Minimization of training, documentation, managing, and auditing of processes created efficiencies and allowed employees to tend to customer needs. “You don’t have to spend so much time reconciling the counting and on purely operational nonvalue tasks. You can really refocus that time on how to relationships, how to ensure that the customers are getting what they need and the best service they can get,” Budde stated.

Automated processes depleted the need for space in bank branches, allowing them to shrink. Banks can then target geographic areas with smaller spaces to reach new populations. These spaces can focus more on consultative and customer-oriented services. If the small branches cannot accommodate all services, the main branch would fulfill these.

Budde explained the importance of 24-hour bank access: “Access is a form of customer expectation at this point because pretty much every vertical was forced to have some kind of access that didn’t require in-person interaction.”

Some services that may soon be available in this 24-hour access include core integration, which allows high-level banking processes such as paying loans to occur through ATMs. Additionally, video tellers may verify IDs for large ATM transactions while the rest of the process is automated so tellers can support 10 to 15 ATMs at once.

For more information on Hyosung and to contact Budde, visit hyosungamericas.com.

Inspired Retail Episode 1
The last two years of labor challenges, financial disruptions, and permanent changes to work and lifestyle has inspired the banking industry’s investment in solutions that will help ease cash flo...

The last two years of labor challenges, financial disruptions, and permanent changes to work and lifestyle has inspired the banking industry’s investment in solutions that will help ease cash flow disruptions. Daniel Litwin and Michael Graham, VP of Retail Solutions & Strategy for Hyosung, discuss how ATMs are meeting the needs of our changing banking landscape.

The pandemic has sped up the banking changes that have ushered in the ATM over 50 years. But can the industry adapt to the closing of physical touchpoints, and will that shift from personal service lead to more innovation?

"In general, banking has been the primary market and innovation driver for ATM solutions. But recent trends that have both dampened the banking market and shifted in-person service at large are giving way to new retail ATM solutions to meet new needs," says Graham. 

With banking apps from Apple, Venmo and others growing in numbers, can the retail ATM improve and change, so it isn't left behind? And is it still a reliable and quality option for consumers?

Join Daniel and Michael as they discuss how Hyosung is working to change the ATM experience.

Inspired Banking Episode 1 Part 2
Cash recycling has been proving itself to be a worthwhile upgrade to ATMs across the globe, creating domino effects from cost savings to safer cash to more efficient banking services for the end-us...

Cash recycling has been proving itself to be a worthwhile upgrade to ATMs across the globe, creating domino effects from cost savings to safer cash to more efficient banking services for the end-user.

Here to give insights on this episode of Inspired Banking, a Hyosung podcast, is Bill Budde, Vice President of Product Marketing at Hyosung. He talked to Host Daniel Litwin about how to really connect the dots between the economy today, how cash is being used, and why recycling ATMs are a worthwhile investment.

Budde previously worked at Chase on their ATM technology. This early work included transaction and deposit automation technology, where he rolled it out across the entire footprint of Chase’s branch network. He moved into incorporating cash recycling into these machines.

With this knowledge, Budde understands how cash moves into today’s society. With debit cards, peer-to-peer payments, and other technologies leading the way on how people spend money, it’s essential to understand how end-users use cash in today’s larger ecosystem.

“Cash is still a predominantly preferred method of payment for in-person transactions,” Budde said. “What we’ve seen over the last 18 months or so is a lot of that in-person interaction, for retail for purchasing in general, kind of disappeared for a while.”

While transactions moved to digital methods during the pandemic, cash remained king. Part of this is that there is still a large population that doesn’t use banks or underutilizes them, according to Budde, and this makes cash the most accessible mechanism to pay.

Inspired Banking Episode 1 Part 1
Cash recycling has been proving itself to be a worthwhile upgrade to ATMs across the globe, creating domino effects from cost savings to safer cash to more efficient banking services for the end-us...

Cash recycling has been proving itself to be a worthwhile upgrade to ATMs across the globe, creating domino effects from cost savings to safer cash to more efficient banking services for the end-user.

Here to give insights on this episode of Inspired Banking, a Hyosung podcast, is Bill Budde, Vice President of Product Marketing at Hyosung. He talked to Host Daniel Litwin about how to really connect the dots between the economy today, how cash is being used, and why recycling ATMs are a worthwhile investment.

Budde previously worked at Chase on their ATM technology. This early work included transaction and deposit automation technology, where he rolled it out across the entire footprint of Chase’s branch network. He moved into incorporating cash recycling into these machines.

With this knowledge, Budde understands how cash moves into today’s society. With debit cards, peer-to-peer payments, and other technologies leading the way on how people spend money, it’s essential to understand how end-users use cash in today’s larger ecosystem.

“Cash is still a predominantly preferred method of payment for in-person transactions,” Budde said. “What we’ve seen over the last 18 months or so is a lot of that in-person interaction, for retail for purchasing in general, kind of disappeared for a while.”

While transactions moved to digital methods during the pandemic, cash remained king. Part of this is that there is still a large population that doesn’t use banks or underutilizes them, according to Budde, and this makes cash the most accessible mechanism to pay.

Video podcast
Inspired Banking Episode 3
Drive-up banking has been around for years, and most use it frequently when they need a simple banking transaction fulfilled. Daniel Litwin sits down with Bill Budde, the VP of Banking Strategy and...

Drive-up banking has been around for years, and most use it frequently when they need a simple banking transaction fulfilled. Daniel Litwin sits down with Bill Budde, the VP of Banking Strategy and Solutions at Hyosung, to discuss evolving trends and technology in drive-up banking.

As technology develops and banking adopts new technologies, we’ll see the banking workforce meet higher efficiency, increasing service hours and improving customer experience. As banks eliminate outdated and hard-to-service technology like VAT, interactions at the banks will become quicker and more enjoyable for individuals.

Ideal use cases include expanding automation both on personal devices and at ATMs. Current consumers are already used to a certain amount of automation, including checking their balance online or on a machine, but enhancing that technology will allow consumers to more easily withdraw from an existing line of credit or even open a new line of credit.

Simply depositing a check or transferring funds from one account to another has become more convenient, however, Budde expresses “the biggest thing you see is the basic transactional stuff customers are [more and more] choosing to self serve… an in-person interaction is centered around the deeper style of needs for customers like opening a new line of credit or fulfilling a mortgage or getting an auto loan. Those are a bigger impact financially on a person’s life.” The more complex banking interactions require individuals or some fulfillment role.

With video calls, an ATM could ultimately be used as a portal to the entire operation of the bank, including more complex financial relationships. A remote individual can check the physical requirements that those transactions would need. Or, if an individual is required for a question, they can be brought into the interaction. The human touchpoint will be more centralized and address more locations.

Overall, convenience has to be flexible based on the customers' needs, but it has its benefits for bank tellers too. There is a trend toward digital-first banking. This trend has grown with customer behavior changes during the pandemic. There has been a drive to automate repetitive tasks to allow employees to focus on customer service and relationship building. Automating these tasks lessens stress and caters to a more engaging work environment. Keeping up with technology will help banks attract and retain employees.

Inspired Banking Episode 2
ATMs have long been a part of the banking processing, but the pandemic accelerated the use of self-service tools in banking was. Bill Budde, Vice President of Banking Strategy and Solutions for Hyo...

ATMs have long been a part of the banking processing, but the pandemic accelerated the use of self-service tools in banking was. Bill Budde, Vice President of Banking Strategy and Solutions for Hyosung, spoke with Inspired Banking host Tyler Kern about the evolution of banking self-service tools and which technology benefits end-user experience and bank efficiency.

The prevalence of deposit automation opened the door to drive straightforward transactions to automation instead and bypass administrative tasks employees would otherwise need to complete. Minimization of training, documentation, managing, and auditing of processes created efficiencies and allowed employees to tend to customer needs. “You don’t have to spend so much time reconciling the counting and on purely operational nonvalue tasks. You can really refocus that time on how to relationships, how to ensure that the customers are getting what they need and the best service they can get,” Budde stated.

Automated processes depleted the need for space in bank branches, allowing them to shrink. Banks can then target geographic areas with smaller spaces to reach new populations. These spaces can focus more on consultative and customer-oriented services. If the small branches cannot accommodate all services, the main branch would fulfill these.

Budde explained the importance of 24-hour bank access: “Access is a form of customer expectation at this point because pretty much every vertical was forced to have some kind of access that didn’t require in-person interaction.”

Some services that may soon be available in this 24-hour access include core integration, which allows high-level banking processes such as paying loans to occur through ATMs. Additionally, video tellers may verify IDs for large ATM transactions while the rest of the process is automated so tellers can support 10 to 15 ATMs at once.

For more information on Hyosung and to contact Budde, visit hyosungamericas.com.

Inspired Retail Episode 1
The last two years of labor challenges, financial disruptions, and permanent changes to work and lifestyle has inspired the banking industry’s investment in solutions that will help ease cash flo...

The last two years of labor challenges, financial disruptions, and permanent changes to work and lifestyle has inspired the banking industry’s investment in solutions that will help ease cash flow disruptions. Daniel Litwin and Michael Graham, VP of Retail Solutions & Strategy for Hyosung, discuss how ATMs are meeting the needs of our changing banking landscape.

The pandemic has sped up the banking changes that have ushered in the ATM over 50 years. But can the industry adapt to the closing of physical touchpoints, and will that shift from personal service lead to more innovation?

"In general, banking has been the primary market and innovation driver for ATM solutions. But recent trends that have both dampened the banking market and shifted in-person service at large are giving way to new retail ATM solutions to meet new needs," says Graham. 

With banking apps from Apple, Venmo and others growing in numbers, can the retail ATM improve and change, so it isn't left behind? And is it still a reliable and quality option for consumers?

Join Daniel and Michael as they discuss how Hyosung is working to change the ATM experience.

Inspired Banking Episode 1 Part 2
Cash recycling has been proving itself to be a worthwhile upgrade to ATMs across the globe, creating domino effects from cost savings to safer cash to more efficient banking services for the end-us...

Cash recycling has been proving itself to be a worthwhile upgrade to ATMs across the globe, creating domino effects from cost savings to safer cash to more efficient banking services for the end-user.

Here to give insights on this episode of Inspired Banking, a Hyosung podcast, is Bill Budde, Vice President of Product Marketing at Hyosung. He talked to Host Daniel Litwin about how to really connect the dots between the economy today, how cash is being used, and why recycling ATMs are a worthwhile investment.

Budde previously worked at Chase on their ATM technology. This early work included transaction and deposit automation technology, where he rolled it out across the entire footprint of Chase’s branch network. He moved into incorporating cash recycling into these machines.

With this knowledge, Budde understands how cash moves into today’s society. With debit cards, peer-to-peer payments, and other technologies leading the way on how people spend money, it’s essential to understand how end-users use cash in today’s larger ecosystem.

“Cash is still a predominantly preferred method of payment for in-person transactions,” Budde said. “What we’ve seen over the last 18 months or so is a lot of that in-person interaction, for retail for purchasing in general, kind of disappeared for a while.”

While transactions moved to digital methods during the pandemic, cash remained king. Part of this is that there is still a large population that doesn’t use banks or underutilizes them, according to Budde, and this makes cash the most accessible mechanism to pay.

Inspired Banking Episode 1 Part 1
Cash recycling has been proving itself to be a worthwhile upgrade to ATMs across the globe, creating domino effects from cost savings to safer cash to more efficient banking services for the end-us...

Cash recycling has been proving itself to be a worthwhile upgrade to ATMs across the globe, creating domino effects from cost savings to safer cash to more efficient banking services for the end-user.

Here to give insights on this episode of Inspired Banking, a Hyosung podcast, is Bill Budde, Vice President of Product Marketing at Hyosung. He talked to Host Daniel Litwin about how to really connect the dots between the economy today, how cash is being used, and why recycling ATMs are a worthwhile investment.

Budde previously worked at Chase on their ATM technology. This early work included transaction and deposit automation technology, where he rolled it out across the entire footprint of Chase’s branch network. He moved into incorporating cash recycling into these machines.

With this knowledge, Budde understands how cash moves into today’s society. With debit cards, peer-to-peer payments, and other technologies leading the way on how people spend money, it’s essential to understand how end-users use cash in today’s larger ecosystem.

“Cash is still a predominantly preferred method of payment for in-person transactions,” Budde said. “What we’ve seen over the last 18 months or so is a lot of that in-person interaction, for retail for purchasing in general, kind of disappeared for a while.”

While transactions moved to digital methods during the pandemic, cash remained king. Part of this is that there is still a large population that doesn’t use banks or underutilizes them, according to Budde, and this makes cash the most accessible mechanism to pay.